Teen Demagogue David Hogg Claims Campus Gerrymandering, Gets Eviscerated On Twitter


Maybe he skipped vocabulary class. On Friday, David Hogg, the anti-gun teen demagogue once dubbed the “king of the snowflakes” on Twitter, posted a tweet in which he decried “gerrymandering” at colleges across the country, prompting many to wonder if he even knows what the term means.

He started with this tweet:

And he followed up with a statement declaring: “The gerrymandering on campus is ridiculous tbh”

For Hogg’s benefit, Merriam Webster defines “gerrymander” as: (1) “to divide or arrange (a territorial unit) into election districts to give one political party an electoral majority in a large number of districts while concentrating the voting strength of the opposition in as few districts as possible,” and (2) “to divide or arrange (an area) into political units to give special advantages to one group.”

Naturally, pretty much everyone’s heard of gerrymandered congressional districts — districts designed to ensure someone like Sheila Jackson Lee gets re-elected to office for the rest of her natural life no matter what she does or says.

So, how are colleges across America gerrymandered?  We’re not sure, and we’re pretty certain Hogg isn’t sure, either.

Reaction on Twitter was pretty much what you’d expect, harsh but well deserved.

Fellow Parkland student Kyle Kashuv wasn’t finished shredding Hogg:

One person suggested:

Perhaps he should go back to high school and retake civics first.

 

Comments like Hogg’s, by the way, remind us of the reason leftists are often called “low-information.”

Much of this post was first seen at Conservative Firing Line

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